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FAQ's

  1. What is the University's policy regarding sexual harassment?
  2. What is a Title IX Coordinator?
  3. Who is the Title IX Coordinator?
  4. What should I do if I think I’ve been sexually harassed, sexually assaulted, or otherwise experienced sexual misconduct?
  5. If an incident of sexual misconduct occurs off-campus, can the University investigate?
  6. If an incident occurred at a party and I was drinking, will I get in trouble?
  7. When is a person unable to give consent?
  8. Someone has filed a complaint against me, what do I do?
  9. I’ve already gone to the police, so why do I need to go to the Title IX Coordinator?
  10. Will my complaint remain confidential?
  11. What if I want to remain anonymous?
  12. Do I have to identify the alleged perpetrator?
  13. I’m concerned that reporting might make matters worse. Should I still file a complaint?
  14. Will I have to pay for counseling/medical care?
  15. My friend told me he or she was assaulted. What can I do to help?
  16. I'm a University employee and someone just reported possible sexual misconduct to me; what do I do now?


What is the University's policy regarding sexual harassment?

Sexual Harassment is a form of unlawful discrimination and is prohibited by the University's Policy on Prohibited Sexual Conduct.

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What is a Title IX Coordinator?

The Title IX Coordinator is the University official responsible for ensuring the University complies with Title IX, including responding to and investigating all complaints of gender discrimination (including Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, and other Sexual Misconduct) at the University.

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Who is the Title IX Coordinator?


Lindsay Samuel
Title IX Coordinator
337-482-2921
Buchanan Hall, Room 303
titleix@louisiana.edu

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What should I do if I think I’ve been sexually harassed, sexually assaulted, or otherwise experienced sexual misconduct?

Contact the Title IX Coordinator at 337-482-2921, by email titleix@louisiana.edu, or you may also fill out a complaint form and email or deliver it to the Title IX Coordinator.

You may also contact the Equal Employment Officer, the Office of the Dean of Students, or the Counseling Center.

If you believe you are a victim of criminal offense, you also have the option to contact ULPD. If it is an emergency, please contact 337-482-6447 or dial 911.

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If an incident of sexual misconduct occurs off-campus, can the University investigate?

Yes. The Policy covers certain Prohibited Sexual Conduct that has taken place off campus where the effects of the conduct may be felt on campus.

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If an incident occurred at a party and I was drinking, will I get in trouble?

Any individual, including a Complainant, witness, or third party, who makes a report will not be subject to disciplinary action by the University for his/her, personal consumption of alcohol or other drugs at or near the time of the incident. The involvement of alcohol or drugs should not prevent the reporting of misconduct.

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When is a person unable to give consent?

In certain situations, a person does not have the capacity to agree to participate in consensual sex. For example, individuals who are under the age of Consent are unable to give Consent. An individual who is Incapacitated also cannot Consent. An individual is considered to be Incapacitated if, by reason of mental or physical condition, the individual is manifestly unable to make a knowing and deliberate choice to engage in sexual activity. Being drunk or intoxicated can lead to Incapacitation; however, someone who is drunk or intoxicated is not necessarily Incapacitated, as Incapacitation is a state beyond drunkenness or intoxication. Individuals who are asleep, unresponsive or unconscious are Incapacitated. Other indicators that an individual may be Incapacitated include, but are not limited to, inability to communicate coherently, inability to dress/undress without assistance, inability to walk without assistance, slurred speech, loss of coordination, vomiting, or inability to perform other physical or cognitive tasks without assistance.

Consent to engage in sexual activity must exist from beginning to end of each instance of sexual activity. Consent is demonstrated through mutually understandable words and/or actions that clearly indicate a willingness to engage in a specific sexual activity. Silence alone, without actions evidencing permission, does not demonstrate Consent. Consent must be knowing and voluntary. To give Consent, a person must be of legal age. Assent does not constitute Consent if obtained through Coercion or from an individual whom the Respondent knows or reasonably should know is Incapacitated. The responsibility of obtaining Consent rests with the person initiating sexual activity. Use of alcohol or drugs does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain Consent. Consent to engage in sexual activity may be withdrawn by any person at any time. Once withdrawal of Consent has been expressed, the sexual activity must cease. Consent is automatically withdrawn by a person who is no longer capable of giving Consent. A current or previous consensual dating or sexual relationship between the Parties does not itself imply Consent or preclude a finding of responsibility. Consent is a voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply Consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Coercion, force, or threat of either invalidates Consent.

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Someone has filed a complaint against me, what do I do?

Do not contact the Complainant through any means - in person, by phone, by mail, by social media or electronic communication or through someone else. Familiarize yourself with the University's Policy and Procedures for investigating complaints of Prohibited Sexual Conduct so that you know what to expect. If you have questions about the Investigation process, contact the Title IX Coordinator. If you need support, contact the University's Counseling Center.

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I’ve already gone to the police, so why do I need to go to the Title IX Coordinator?

Some types of Prohibited Sexual Conduct are potential crimes, but they also are violations of Title IX and the University's Policy on Prohibited Sexual Conduct. While the police can address the criminal aspects of such conduct, the University can address the effects the conduct has on campus. When the University is aware of an incident, it can take steps to institute Interim Protective Measures and provide resources for Complainants. The University can also conduct an Investigation, which may result in disciplinary action against a Respondent. Disciplinary action may include sanctions such as expulsion (students), termination (employees), rescission of contracts (vendors), or a ban from campus (other Respondents).

The University is committed to addressing and preventing Prohibited Sexual Conduct, regardless of whether such activity constitutes a crime.

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Will my complaint remain confidential?

The privacy of the parties is a priority to UL Lafayette. However, sometimes, limited information must be disclosed in order to fully investigate a complaint. If you are concerned about confidentiality, discuss this issue with the Title IX Coordinator.

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What if I want to remain anonymous?

Your confidentiality will be protected to the maximum extent possible, but anonymity may hinder an investigation into your complaint.

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Do I have to identify the alleged perpetrator?

Yes, in order to conduct a thorough investigation, the alleged perpetrator must be identified.

No. If you choose to respond informally and do not file a formal complaint, you do not have to identify the alleged perpetrator. Complainants should be aware that not identifying the perpetrator may limit the institution’s ability to respond comprehensively.

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I’m concerned that reporting might make matters worse. Should I still file a complaint?

Yes. If you have concerns for your safety, ULPD can provide escort services and take other steps to assist you. In addition, UL Lafayette has a strong retaliation policy that is aggressively enforced if a complainant or a witness is retaliated against for participating in an investigation.

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Will I have to pay for counseling/medical care?

The University provides all students basic health and counseling services. If a complainant wishes to access community and non-institutional services, payment for these will be subject to state/local laws, insurance requirements, etc.

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My friend told me he or she was assaulted. What can I do to help?

Be supportive—listen to what she or he has to say then encourage your friend to report the incident to the police or to the Title IX Coordinator. You should also consider reporting the incident yourself. You may suggest that they contact the University’s Counseling Center.

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I'm a University employee and someone just reported possible sexual misconduct to me; what do I do now?

Check out this guide for the various reports that must be made, and when.

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